Japan’s flea market Fril sets up idols corner

26 Oct 2017

Fril, Japan’s leading online flea market mainly supported by female fashion enthusiasts, added a dedicated section called Live Goods Mall, where it lists items used as props in entertainment shows, and which are associated with celebrities.

Tokyo-based Fablic Inc. launched Fril in 2012. After four years, Rakuten Inc. (TSE: 4755) acquired 100 percent of Fablic Inc.. Rakuten also operates c-to-c mobile stuff app Rakuma in Japan and Taiwan.

The mall features items used at live venues where artists performed music shows, such as towels, fans, and penlights.

In recent years, as the number of musical events grew, the sale of entertainment genres, including live goods on Fril, jumped a staggering seven times in September year-on-year, according to a news release.

Fril is also becoming more flexible to categories other than female fashion products. Genres with high sales growth rates in the past year included men’s fashion, cosmetics, beauty items, smartphones, home electronics and female fashion products, according to another news release (here).

Fril promises it takes only three minutes to list an item. The stuff marketplace charges no listing fee and also no sales commission – a fact that pushed up its app downloads to 10 million in September.

This figure is still far behind market leader Mercari, whose app has been installed more than 50 million times in Japan alone since its launch in 2013. It also operates in the U.S., where it has been installed 25 million times.

 

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Tariq Ahmed Saeedi

Tariq Ahmed Saeedi writes stories on sharing economies in Asia – particularly Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam, Korea, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Iran. He joined the AIM Group in January 2016. Tariq is also a spotter, monitoring global marketplace industry’s updates. He carries more than 15 years of writing experience. Tariq frequently contributes economic/tech news and analysis to a daily The News International and a magazine. He has also written features and interview articles for various other publications and some of his write-ups have been cited for references in reports by the World Bank and archived in Florida Institute of Technology’s library. Tariq has also narrated corporate website content for Audi importer in Pakistan and others. He started his career from a television’s current affairs department in 2003 and later joined the country’s premier news agency Pakistan Press International.